Monday, March 5, 2018

Tell It True

Should the page fit the story, or should the story fit the page?

Maybe it's both -- page and story converge gradually, with a greater sense of intention and clarity, as the creative process goes along. I usually start a page not with a sense of what supplies or design I want to use, but rather, with a feeling or theme in mind, and both story and page begin to take shape from there. 

Sometimes, however, trusting that the idea that I want to convey will materialize eventually can be a challenge, especially when I am working on a project that asks me to venture into new territory. 

The "funeral page" is an example of that territory. It isn't exactly a common page topic. The tribute page is generally as close as most scrapbookers get when it comes to documenting loss. I've seen threads on forums asking whether it was "weird" to take photos at a funeral, or about whether it was "okay" to scrapbook a funeral. The few funeral layouts that I have seen -- and I've only seen two or three -- included dark and somber colors, as well as understated patterns and fonts. They definitely did not look like this: 
This is the only layout that I have ever made about a funeral, although I suppose "funeral" is a misnomer, as my Uncle Joe specifically requested NOT to have a somber and serious funeral, but a lively party instead. There are no funerary blacks and navys here -- just elements that remind me of my uncle and his Hawai'i roots, his love of the ocean, and his vibrant personality. 

I will admit that I had reservations about creating this page -- not just because of the topic, but because of the approach I wanted to take. I mean, I used the word "fun" pretty boldly here -- was that okay? 

My uncle would definitely say yes, so I'm cool with it. 

I choose to think of this page not just as a reminder of a colorful life well-lived, but of the importance of giving ourselves permission to tell stories in ways that feel real and vivid and true to us. 

8 comments:

  1. Jill, this is the most beautiful memorial page I've seen. What a wonderful way to remember a wonderful uncle.

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    1. Aww, thank you so much for saying that!

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  2. I have been a lurker for eons but have to comment on this page. What a wonderful tribute.

    I have always loved your use of layering and your choice of papers and use of colour. As a matter of fact, I have scraplifted a number of your layouts. Just like you, I often use more than one photo in my layouts, often many more, and am always looking for ways to incorporate several photos in different ways. Jill, to the rescue!

    As an aside, where do I find that lovely bright yellow paper? I have looked everywhere.

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    1. Hi! Thanks so much for your comment! The yellow paper is from the "Gather" collection from Crate Paper/Maggie Holmes: http://crate.typepad.com/cratepaper/2016/08/mh-gather.html

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  3. Wow you seemed to capture how to remember this person. A memorial of his life here on earth by the ones who loved him the most.

    By the way I have been asked to take pictures at funerals and took several of my own family members. It is a way for me to heal from the loss.

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    1. Your comment makes me think about why more of us don't document funerals and farewells. They just as much a part of life as birthdays, weddings, and other rituals.

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  4. What a lovely tribute page! I love the strips on the right. Beautiful page!

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  5. This is great! It does totally convey his personality. What a lovely way to honor him.

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