Wednesday, May 30, 2018

Stash-Busting Challenge 2018: The Kit

This year's kit is all kinds of color-happy, with a few "buffer" neutrals thrown in to to ensure that all of the strong color personalities play nicely together. Here's the list:
1. Eight pieces of patterned paper scraps, four specialty paper/"other" paper scraps, and two complete/unused sheets of patterned paper that you know you should stop hoarding and should just start using.   
The baseline colors I chose are primary ones -- red, yellow, blue -- with variations here and there. Among the manufacturers are (L-R) Studio Calico, Freckled Fawn, Pretty Little Studio, KI Memories, more Freckled Fawn, Scraptastic, more Studio Calico, Shimelle/American Crafts, even more Studio Calico, and My Mind's Eye. The specialty papers include blueprint paper, uber-cute kitty packaging, wood veneer, and Anthropologie packaging.  A few items here were among my paper choices for past challenges, but I'm working them in because I love them so and didn't use them up the last time around. 
2.  No more than one yard of ribbon/trim; if you want to make this extra challenging, no individual piece can measure more than 12" in length. 
I worked in rainbow ribbon from KI Memories (I've included this in a past challenge, but I still have more left!), a red-orange circle-pattern ribbon (not sure about the manufacturer -- maybe Cosmo Cricket?), as well as white Offray ribbon that I plan to ink/stamp/embellish somehow. We shall see...
3. One sticker sheet or sticker set, with a catch: at least one sticker must be missing from the sheet/set. 
My choice for this item is the chipboard circle sticker set from Studio Calico (slightly to the left, just above the orange arrow).  I wanted to be sure to include dimensional elements in my kit. 
4. A pre-2016 alphabet set. If you don't have a set this old (or don't feel like doing the research to figure out if the set is pre-2016), aim for one of your oldest sets. 
Duuuuude. This was the most depressing part of my kit-content search. I have so many alphabet sets that fit this description. Too many. Intervention time. Among the stacks (and stacks) of alphabets from yesteryear, I unearthed some red chipboard BasicGrey alphas that I am looking forward to actually using. 
5. One opened package/container of scrappy product.     
This one was easy: Crate Paper's Here + There ephemera. It has a lot of travel-themed product, and I am fairly certain that at least one of my projects is going to be travel-related (though not related to my travels, as I rarely leave this island!).  The die-cuts don't have to be used for travel pages, however -- they are versatile. Given my inclination toward bits and pieces, I also wanted to select an item that included lots of smaller elements that could be included in projects. 
6.  One unopened package/container of scrappy product. If you don't have any unopened product, opt for an opened package/container that has hardly been used, or the newest package of product that you added to your stash.  
Enamel shapes are quickly becoming one of my favorite accents, so it's actually kind of shocking that I haven't yet broken into my pack of Amy Tangerine enamel stickers. These are so going to get the attention that they deserve. 
7. One roll of tape (washi tape or other decorative tape) or a package/pad of sticky notes (acid-free ones recommended!).  
This time around, I'm opting for sticky notes instead of tape. Even though I don't have as many sticky notes as I do rolls of tape, I do still have a bunch, and they will nicely serve my need to journal within smaller spaces and then tuck those smaller bits into the layers of a layout and/or pull them together and stitch over them.  I chose a pack of assorted sticky notes from Studio Calico. 
8.  One item or package of product from a company that no longer makes scrappy products (or that has not had a new release within the past two years) or one of the oldest items in your stash.  
If I had my druthers, I would bring back KI Memories and never let it disappear again. For now, I will settle for including KI Memories product in my kits each time around, in the hopes that by the time I run out, there will miraculously be more to replace them. The item I chose is chipboard stickers from Love, Elsie, a "spin-off" line from KI Memories. These chipboard pieces may be older, but they still feel as fresh and original as they did when I bought them years ago. 
9. Up to ten journaling and/or Project Life cards/tags (if you don't have individual cards/tags, you can cut them from a journaling-card-style patterned sheet or use a printable, if you wish).  
My choice of journaling/PL cards/tags included neutral colors, so that I could use them on practically any project. I went with cards/tags from Ali Edwards, Studio Calico, Pretty Little Studio, as well as some "found" items that could be used to house journaling. 
10.    Three "wild card" items. Include anything you've been wanting to use (regardless of whether it is old or new, opened or unopened).   
The three "wild card" items in the kit are fabric tags from Studio Calico/Hello Forever, envelopes from Crate Paper's Here +There collection, and the acrylic word "onward," which is my "one little word" for this year -- maybe including it in the kit will actually get me to use the thing! 
11. A nearby item. Grab something from your desk or craft area that is within arm's reach. This will be fairly easy to do if you are a mess-maker like me. If you are super-organized and have no items within reach, then head for the nearest drawer or bin, close your eyes, and reach blindly. The item that you retrieve will be the final addition to your kit. 
I just realized that I forgot to add this to the kit pic -- just like last year. Ha! In a tray on my desk, I found a tiny bag containing a mix of stick pins and small heart and star wood veneer pieces (possibly from an old JBS kit? They have that homey feel).
Thaaaat's it! Gathering the kit components is always a thrill, but now the real fun begins -- seeing where each item will lead me as I create the projects for this year's stash-busting challenge. I can't wait!  

If you're playing along and are done assembling your kit, I'd love to see it!  If you're sharing a pic on your blog, leave a link in the comments below, or if you're sharing on Instagram, be sure to tag me (@jill.scrap) and use the hashtag #stashbustingchallenge2018.  You can also share your pic via the Get It Scrapped Facebook group, if you're a member (and if you aren't a member, you can be added to the group!).  

Have a great day! 
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Tuesday, May 29, 2018

Ready for Another Stash-Busting Challenge?

In a few days' time, we will officially begin this summer's stash-busting challenge.  Last year's challenge was so much fun -- and so effective in "busting" through a few of the layers in my stash -- that it's prompted me (with lots of encouragement from YOU all!) to make it an annual summertime tradition. Care to play along? 

The challenge is actually based on the Ms. Pacman challenge we played back in the day at Jenni Bowlin Studio. I'm guessing it was called that because it focused on taking a "bite" out of one's stash. 

The basics are pretty simple: compile your own kit based on the list of contents and use that kit to create at least three projects (layouts, cards, etc.) over the course of the summer (that is, a teacher's summer: June and July). 

Here are the basic kit components to "harvest" from your stash, featuring tiny modifications from last year's list: 
1. Eight pieces of patterned paper scraps, four specialty paper/"other" paper scraps, and two complete/unused sheets of patterned paper that you know you should stop hoarding and should just start using.  
2.  No more than one yard of ribbon/trim; if you want to make this extra challenging, no individual piece can measure more than 12" in length. 
3. One sticker sheet or sticker set, with a catch: at least one sticker must be missing from the sheet/set. 
4. A pre-2016 alphabet set. If you don't have a set this old (or don't feel like doing the research to figure out if the set is pre-2016), aim for one of your oldest sets. 
5. One opened package/container of scrappy product.     
6.  One unopened package/container of scrappy product. If you don't have any unopened product, opt for an opened package/container that has hardly been used, or the newest package of product that you added to your stash.  
7. One roll of tape (washi tape or other decorative tape) or a package/pad of sticky notes (acid-free ones recommended!).  
8.  One item or package of product from a company that no longer makes scrappy products (or that has not had a new release within the past two years) or one of the oldest items in your stash.  
9. Up to ten journaling and/or Project Life cards/tags (if you don't have individual cards/tags, you can cut them from a journaling-card-style patterned sheet or use a printable, if you wish).  
10.    Three "wild card" items. Include anything you've been wanting to use (regardless of whether it is old or new, opened or unopened).   
11. A nearby item. Grab something from your desk or craft area that is within arm's reach. This will be fairly easy to do if you are a mess-maker like me. If you are super-organized and have no items within reach, then head for the nearest drawer or bin, close your eyes, and reach blindly. The item that you retrieve will be the final addition to your kit. 
As with last time, the kit includes unlimited cardstock, adhesive, and "technique-type product" (e.g. stamps, stamping ink, paint, mist, stencils, embossing powder, etc.).  
You don't need to use every little bit of the kit that you create, but try your best to take a "bite" out of it anyway. 

If any of the guidelines above are cramping your style, feel free to modify them so that you can be your best stash-busting self.  For instance, if you're in the midst of working on a project, and you realize something that isn't in your kit but in your stash would look great on that project, then go ahead and add it anyway. This is a judgment-free challenge!  

Accounting for the rummaging and scavenging time as we compile our kits, plus more time to create three layouts while also enjoying the summer months, let's aim to complete a minimum of three projects by July 31, 2018 at 11:59 p.m. EST.  

If you can't make it by then, no worries, but if you can, I'll enter you in a drawing for a scrappy giveaway. Just be sure to share your three projects on Instagram (I'm @jill.scrap; tag me and also use the hashtag #stashbustingchallenge2018 when posting your images). If Instagram isn't your thing, you can also post your images and tag me via the Get It Scrapped Community on Facebook, or you can post on your blog and share a link to the post in the comments below.  You don't have to post everything all at once -- individual posts are totally fine! 

Once you've made your own kit, take a photo of it, and blog (and/or share via Instagram or some other form of social media) your list of kit items (see this example from last year).  Then get started on those projects. I can't wait to see what you create! 

I'll update with my kit pic soon! 

Monday, May 28, 2018

Getting It Scrapped

One of the reasons I love being part of the Get It Scrapped team is that the assignments never feel like actual assignments -- they feel like an invitation to play and to discover, and in the process, to make something meaningful. 

Exhibit #1
This layout came about for a feature focused on embellishing focal points
Most of the time, my photos are backed with photo mats, often in layers of papers, but this was a fun departure from that, challenging me to use something other than the usual photo mat approach. I rummaged through my stash in search of everything and anything dog-related, and emerged with a mix of items from Crate Paper, Studio Calico, and KI Memories/Love, Elsie.  I would totally try this again! 

Exhibit #2
Even though I insist on journaling on every project and have tried lots of different approaches to doing that, I had never before attempted "mix and match" journaling until I created this layout. 
In the process of bringing together both narratives here, I pared down the number of papers and accents that I usually use so that the words would remain the focus.  I knew that I wanted to tell this story, but I was not quite sure how to do that until this GIS assignment gave me the opportunity to take notice of the multiple narratives that converge each day in our schools, both of which have at their hearts the well-being of our students. 

If you haven't stopped by the Get It Scrapped blog, be sure to do so. You never know just how transformative some of the ideas there can be until you try them. 
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Sunday, May 27, 2018

HKC Hawaii Mini-Album

In the midst of one of the busiest weeks of the school year -- a week containing final exams, final grade calculations, classroom deep-cleaning, and the commencement ceremony -- I still managed to set aside some time over the course of a few evenings to work on this mini-album using the Hip Kit Club May 2018 main kit. 

I scrapbook for a lot of reasons, and one of them is for stress relief. Focusing on something creative and colorful, even if only in short bursts, really can be therapeutic.  

Another reason that I scrapbook is that it invites reflection; it opens up moments for contemplation, revelation, and gratitude. This mini-album is the product of that, pulling together photos and journaling about the place I am grateful to call home. 


Saturday, May 19, 2018

Life in Technicolor

Maybe it's just the product of working with Hip Kit Club kits so often, or perhaps spring is to blame, but I am feeling color-happy lately. 
 
I'm embracing the rainbow. 
I'm working with the colors of sunshine and grass and sky and flowers. 
I'm documenting the way that love itself colors my world.
One of the perks of being a scrapbooker is being surrounded at all times by colorful possibilities. :) 

Saturday, May 12, 2018

What I Love Most About May


1.  Endings and beginnings seem indistinguishable from each other. Flowers bloom profusely, fading within a few days' time as more buds appear and unfurl themselves. My seniors, who have been looking ahead all year long and counting the days until graduation, now look back wistfully; they are somewhere between holding on and letting go.

2. There is a heightened sense of togetherness.  People gather to fill theaters for summer movie premieres, arenas and auditoriums for graduation ceremonies, fields and gymnasiums for May Day celebrations, churches for Baccalaureate masses, restaurants for Mother's Day, and even online forums for International Scrapbook Day.

3. After the final exams and farewells, May moves seamlessly into the summer months. It is a busy month, but the last few days have a gentle lilt and flow. I often do not realize it has ended until I look at a calendar and see that it is June.

4. The usual routines begin to fall away. This can be bewildering at first, especially for someone who is always productive, always ON, always reliant on alarms and calendars and to-do lists, but the routines that were necessary at the beginning of the month are no longer necessary at the end of the month. Those last days of May? Limitless.

5. It is a time of reaching outward and inward.  In saying goodbye to another class, another school year, I search myself. I question my purpose, my impact. I wonder, do I matter? Did I make this year matter? Will I be remembered? When my face recedes from my students' memories, will something more remain? What is my legacy?  Heavy, I know. Blame May.